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Tanzania Tour Agents Hatch Huge Plan to Turn DAR into Paris of East Africa

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Tanzania Tour Operators are mulling over the idea of turning the country’s commercial centre of Dar Es Salaam into a ‘tourism paradise’, a copycat of Paris, in their bid to woo massive foreign visitor influx. The French capital is a huge draw for foreign visitors – receiving 40 million of them a year, more than any other city in the world.

Tanzania Tour Operators are mulling over the idea of turning the country’s commercial centre of Dar Es Salaam into a ‘tourism paradise’, a copycat of Paris, in their bid to woo massive foreign visitor influx.

The French capital is a huge draw for foreign visitors – receiving 40 million of them a year, more than any other city in the world.

There is the city’s romantic image, the stunning architecture, the Louvre Museum, the iconic Eiffel Tower, as well as the simple pleasure of sitting at a café terrace and watching the world go by, not to mention the spectacular sunsets.

Tanzania Association of Tour Operators (TATO) recently engaged tour operators based in Dar Es Salaam in a roundtable discussion where the ambitious idea of transforming the city into the tourists’ hotspot like Paris, was born.

TATO Vice-Chairman, Henry Kimambo, says Dar Es Salaam is a tourism’s sleeping giant, considering its untapped attractions such as spectacular beaches and islands, picturesque architecture, museums, churches, breathtaking gardens, monument, ruins, galleries, markets and Kigamboni Bridge, among others.

In 1865, Sultan Majid bin Said of Zanzibar began building a new city very close to Mzizima and named it Dar es Salaam. The name is commonly translated as “abode/home of peace”, based on the Arabic dar (“house”), and the Arabic es Salaam (“of peace”).

“As the government shifts its seat to Dodoma, let’s create compelling tourism products in Dar Es Salaam to attract massive numbers of visitors, as is the case with Paris,” Mr Kimambo told tour operators gathered at National College of Tourism.

He implored the Dar Es Salaam-based tour operators to join forces with their counterparts in the northern tourism circuit in transforming the city into a true tourist allure.

Indeed, Dar Es Salaam, the busiest port in East Africa and commercial centre on Tanzania’s Indian Ocean coast rich in historical sites, grew from a fishing village to the country’s largest city.

The open-air Village Museum has re-created the traditional homes of local and other Tanzanian tribes and hosts tribal dancing.

This is part of the National Museum, which offers Tanzanian history exhibits, including the fossils of human ancestors found by anthropologist Dr Louis Leakey.

Patrick Salum, the founder of Paradise and Wilderness Tours, says “it goes without saying, Dar Es Salaam is a leisure city and what is needed is infrastructure in beaches be upgraded, marketing be enhanced and services be improved for it to draw massive tourists”.

Tanzania’s tourism guru, Moses Njole, says plans are underway to develop the beaches into a real tourist allure as part of the ambitious strategy to make Dar Es Salaam the Paris of East Africa.

“If all goes well, a grand plan is in pipeline that will involve the Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism and the Dar Es Salaam City Council to develop various tourism products along the beach in a bid to attract visitors a Paris does,” explains Njole who doubles as a tourism lecturer at College of African Wildlife Management (CAWM) at Mweka in Kilimanjaro Region.

The Minister for Natural Resources and Tourism, Dr Hamis Kigwangalla, is on record as saying his docket is in the process of establishing a beach management authority to improve beach tourism.

Dr Kigwangalla is concerned that beach tourism was doing much better in Zanzibar than on Tanzania Mainland. “Beach tourism is not being promoted on mainland Tanzania with its abundant potential,” he notes.

It is understood that the uninhabited islands of Bongoyo, Mbudya, Pangavini and Fungu Yasini, just off the coastline north of Dar es Salaam, form this marine reserve system, a key tourist attraction.